“Goliath’s Season 4” Review: The last season of Billy Bob Thornton’s legal drama

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Goliath Season 4 Review

Amazon Original Goliath tells the story of Billy McBride (Billy Bob Thornton), a washed lawyer who suddenly found a desire for the law again after a big case became personal.

During the last three seasons of the legal drama, we have seen Billy up with large oils, cartels, and some serious hazardous water thieves. And now, in the last season of the series, he finally went to the head-to-head with Big Pharma.

Goliath season 4 begins shortly after season 3; Billy (Billy Bob Thornton) is still recovering from a gunshot wound. Patty (Nina Arianda) works at a cosy San Francisco law firm, Margolis & True. Patty introduces Billy to the corporate flock after partner Tom True disappears amid a massive lawsuit against a group of companies responsible for sustaining the opioid epidemic. No one can imagine why Tom left the case. Because it is so personal to him. His young daughter died after an opioid overdose.

As Billy gets used to his new home and job:

He continues to grapple with the trauma of the shooting and the dreams of his daughter Denise (Diana Hopper). It’s not great at all. But he’s intrigued by the spectacular pharmaceutical CEO.

They’re dealing with (JK Simmons). And why no one has a natural explanation for Tom’s disappearance. As Billy prepares to lead this massive case. He realizes there may be more to the story. And he’s not the only one interested.

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Goliath has been so mixed up in recent years. The first season came out strong (if a little odd) out of the gate, building a completely different world in Los Angeles and colouring its characters in interesting little details. Season 2 was fun but failed to capture the magic of Season 1, and Season 3 slipped a bit, though the show is undeniably noticeable all the time.

In season 4, Goliath fully embraces the peculiar quirks. He’s given us over these three seasons. Delving a little deeper into Billy’s psyche. And the impact of all the trauma he’s endured in recent years. (It’s not an amputated fetish or whatever happened to William Hurt in season 1, but he’s still crazy).

Considering what the show has done so far, it’s a bold move, but it works, especially for the final season. Those big swings may not always incorporate the punch they’re hoping for, but it’s hard to fault a show brave enough to pull off such a move.

The first part of Season 4 discussed here:

Hadleyville, gives us enough to keep us interested at the end of the season. And introduces us to the upcoming battle against Big Pharma and who the leading players are. Still shaking from the events of last season, Patty is waging her battle, a war we’ll probably see later.

There’s also the mysterious nature of the recent digs of Billy and his wary neighbour (Bruce Dern). Someone one can ignore unless the iconic actor plays. Between odd phone calls and glimpses from his neighbours, odd street dates. And the possible truth in Tom True’s tapes and other records. Billy is on his way to hell’s streets this season.

Perhaps best known for films like Donnie Darko, The Hunger Games, and The Neon Demon, Jena Malone is a welcome addition to the cast and gives Samantha Margolis her dry wit and charm. He is a very consistent and engaging artist who brings something interesting to every project he handles.

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Even though he doesn’t get to do much work in the first part of this fourth season, he easily clings to Thornton during their first meeting, and the teasing and determination he shows later in this episode is just a sense of the excitement that comes with it. This season.

Goliath is usually a bit of a mess. Thanks to Thornton’s consistent performance. And the addition of heavy punches like J.K. Simmons and Bruce Dern, worth more than time.

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