Thaen movie review: Story of a naïve and uneducated youngster, who earns living by beekeeping in a forest

2
Thaen movie review

Ganesh Vinekan’s Thaen opened with a few beautiful air shots from Hill Kurinji Station, building a background where the protruding character is located. The lives of several residents in the forest and their work, including the Velu (Tharun). Where he produces a life with bees.

Poonkodi (abarnati), another resident of the stuff:

Whose father was treated by the Velu, fell in love with him? The couple gradually decided to lead a life with the commemoration of the village head and others on the hill. After several years of marriage happiness, including a girl’s birth, the couple got a surprise in their lives.

You may also read The Courier Movie Review: Even though espionage buffs may find some of the genre tropes familiar

Everything gets worse when the Velu brings Poonkodi to a government hospital in the city. Especially by someone in the hospital, the Velu. Who does not have a valid document to prove its citizenship and rights, struggling to take advantage of its treatment. Can he save his wife?

Tharun and Abarnathi exhibited the required emotions – the first successfully conveyed his vulnerability through his expression and language.

The fate of the illiterate man who has no evidence to prove his citizenship in the democracy. Its various malpractices involved in obtaining different ID cards. Apart from men’s and women’s direction, this film does not have many leading roles.

Except for Lakshhman’s Bava, which makes his presence felt in all scenes that appear.

The dialogue is witty and hitting hard about the government identifying its citizens is quite interesting. This film has combined several actual life incidents to spice up emotions, although it only works in several scenes, thanks to the melodrama’s overdose. That affects the overall impact of the plot.

On the technical front, MINEAL S KUMAR is prominent, thanks to the fantastic shot, catching the beauty of Bukit Kurinji. Thangadurai’s constant dialogue towards the final part of the film is worth mentioning.

Thaen Ganesh Vinayang is an underdog fight against a flawed system. The protagonist, the Velu, is a greedy corporate victim and danger caused by their factory.

You may also read The last Vermeer: A story which features the era of WW2 and Nazi Germany

Thaen is not the first Tamil film with this storyline in essence, so the novelty is not the main pull here. When the narrative is predictable, it is a show and manufacture that keeps the audience invest.

But here, despite being able to lead the actor, there is a termination. Between the audience and film because of the problem with direction. We saw the Tharun Velu strike, and Poonkodi Abarnadhi stretched in pain for several scenes, but their pain hardly touched us.

Sometimes we feel we don’t know enough characters to grieve with them:

Later, we are just confused by how everyone they crossed paths is evil. Kurinji Malai, Bukit-Top village couple living, is their Eden in a certain sense.

Just like Adam and Eve, who were safe in their garden, went through suffering as soon as they went down to earth, the Velu and Poonkodi met many demons after leaving their residence.

Things turned into cruel and unrealistic, and from VAO to ambulance drivers, everyone they met treats them with excess hatred. Even good, which offers a helpful couple, change their minds in the next scene without reason.

For most of the second half, Poonkodi was said to have a terrible disease. But I wondered why I did not even disclose it to the audience until the last action.

You may also read Time To Dance Movie Review: Did Sooraj Pancholi did justice to the role?

Giving us some detail of his illness, instead of just showing us a random shot from him writhing in pain, might get our sympathy.

It also frustrates how filmmakers who represent the victims’ rights in the anti-establishment film failed miserably in describing their names. In Ganesh, everyone who wore pants was terrible, and the English people who spoke were a symbol of the crime.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

five × 5 =